Luke 13:18-21

He said therefore, ‘What is the kingdom of God like? And to what should I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in the garden; it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.’

 And again he said, ‘To what should I compare the kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.’

What is the kingdom of God likeÉ to what shall we compare the kingdom of God?”

Those are the questions before us in today’s Gospel reading. The answer is that the kingdom of God is like a mustard seed, like yeast mixed with flour.

I was skiing with my six-year-old nephew one afternoon. His mother had been with him in the morning. One of the children had seen his mom with him, and then me with him, so she asked him if I was his “other mom.” He said, “no, she’s my aunt.” Then the two of them resumed their skiing after their matter-of-fact conversation. How I hope they will always naturally see the possibility of a family having many different forms. How I pray the seeds of inclusion sown into their innocent hearts will shape the world.

A pastor, struggling with the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the church, was visiting the church I serve. A young woman he had known and loved as a teenager approached him and asked if he remembered her. He did and was joyful in being reunited with her. She proudly introduced him to her new wife. The newlyweds enthusiastically shared with him about how being in a church where they are more than welcomed, are also fully affirmed and included, enables them to live in and live out their faith.

Before he left, he said to me with heart-felt conviction, “keep providing a safe place where spiritual growth can happen.” The yeast of relationship, opening the door of a heart. The kingdom of God is found in the seeds of inclusion, in the yeast of relationships.

When we live in that kingdom, lives are saved, the world is changed.

Access the entire RMN Lenten daily devotional

 A Season of Becoming: Restoring and being restored for the transformation of the church and world

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